Center for Media Innovation

Bridge Pittsburgh Hires Project Editor

Bridge Pittsburgh Media Partnership is pleased to announce that it has hired AmyJo Brown to serve as the collaboration’s founding project editor. Brown has had a long history in journalism, and as a Pittsburgh native, she has deep roots in the region as well. Please join us in welcoming her to Bridge Pittsburgh.

Center for Media Innovation
Bridge Pittsburgh Hires Project Editor

2019 microgrants awarded to 3 projects

In 2019, the Bridge Pittsburgh Media Partnership awarded $1,500 microgrants to organizations in Western Pennyslvania who proposed collaborative journalistic projects. They included partnerships between Environmental Health News and PublicSource; Cal Times, WCAL-FM, CUTV (California University of Pennsylvania student media) & Mon Valley Independent; and student media The Pitt News (University of Pittsburgh) and The Globe (Point Park University).

2019 microgrants awarded to 3 projects

Students join Youth Express to learn about media literacy

In a small, windowless recording studio on a sunny and warm Monday afternoon, students ranging from the 5th grade to 12th grade — from schools from across the Pittsburgh region — discussed where they get their news and what’s missing from the media when it comes to young people. The students also cited issues such as a lack of equity in education, police violence and racism, pollution, and climate change as among their top priorities when it comes to local media coverage.

Students join Youth Express to learn about media literacy

Homewood residents share thoughts on news coverage of their community

Journalists and Homewood residents broke bread together at the Homewood library while talking about the ways news coverage shapes the community. Residents said the stories focus too often on negative coverage of places such as Homewood, Penn Hills and Westinghouse high school. They asked for more positive stories about the organizations and people doing good work.

Homewood residents share thoughts on news coverage of their community

California outreach event: We might be a family after all

A place like California, Pa., can seem a long way from urban Pittsburgh. Yet, when we started talking about the issues that are important to people in rural areas south of the city, residents talked about many of the same things we heard in other places. People want more transparency from local government, they want the best possible education and opportunities for their young people, and they worry about the spread of drugs. 

California outreach event: We might be a family after all

Gazette 2.0 helps McKees Rocks tell its own stories

In the back room of Fox’s Pizza Den, where NFL helmets hung mounted to the walls next to photos of Steelers players and arcade games played an electronic serenade in the background, residents from the McKees Rocks area turned out for a journalism workshop — and to share their story ideas with the staff of Gazette 2.0.

Gazette 2.0 helps McKees Rocks tell its own stories

Speak your truth about disability — and media coverage

A community listening session called "Speak Your Truth About Disability" was held in April on Pittsburgh's North Side. This community engagement event was hosted by local media outlets Storyburgh and Unabridged Press, and sponsored by the Pittsburgh Bridge Media Partnership. Journalists from PublicSource and Northside Chronicle attended as well. Access Mob Pittsburgh also partnered in bringing its constituents to the discussion.

Speak your truth about disability — and media coverage

What we learned about the Pittsburgh media ecosystem

As founding father and newspaper editor Ben Franklin once suggested, "We must all hang together, or most assuredly we shall all hang separately.” With that in mind, Bridge Pittsburgh Media Partnership seeks to bring together news outlets across Western Pennsylvania to engage in collaboration. Media Impact Funders conducted a study of the Pittsburgh media ecosystem, and discovered relative strengths. But we think it could be stronger.

What we learned about the Pittsburgh media ecosystem